Latest ResearchWhere is this place located?

Log in to follow, share, and participate in this community. Not a member? Join Now!

Recent Content

Refresh this widget
Filter by Categories & Tags

MIT CDB Assistant Professor, Renee Gosline, Describes Digital Marketing's Newest Influencers

MIT CDB Video: Sinan Aral on Social Commerce


At the recent MIT CDB conference on Big Data, professor and social networking expert, Sinan Aral, discusses peer influence and how it can impact product marketing strategies and the online economy.




Popular Blog Posts

Can workers actually be beneficiaries of the digital economy? MIT Sloan Professor Zeynep Ton believes the answer is yes. And just as importantly, she says, businesses won’t lose out in the process.download.jpg

 

Much has been written and discussed about the economic inequalities created as a result of digital technologies. In this blog, for example, MIT Research Scientist, Andrew McAfee, cites significant economic data supporting the view that IT is responsible for tectonic changes in U.S. jobs and wages. Professor Ton’s latest research offers some win-win scenarios for employees and their employers.

 

In a recent presentation, Ton, Adjunct Associate Professor of Operations Management (pictured at left), went beyond defining the problems of job displacement, dissatisfaction and despair; she offered solutions. Her latest book, “The Good Jobs Strategy,” examines ways to bridge some of the widely acknowledged economic gaps and suggests ways that organizations “can design and manage their operations in a way that satisfies employees, customers and investors simultaneously.”

 

Tossing Out Conventional Wisdom

Ton asserts that currently, one in four workers – especially in the service sector and retail—has a “bad job” where salaries are insufficient to support families, and work is rote, irregular and unsatisfying. In such environments, “workers are set up to fail.” But businesses and society fail as well, she maintains. “The conventional wisdom is that bad jobs are necessary to keep costs low and profits high. Even advocates for higher wages believe higher wages they will come at a cost—either higher prices for customers or lower profits for companies.”

 

However, better operational strategies can break the pattern, she says. It may be counter-intuitive, Ton explained at a meeting of the MIT IDE in March, but combining investment in people with smart decisions like empowering workers—not cutting back—often proves most profitable.

 

In case after case, she found that more and better-trained and motivated staff can generate higher profit and growth and help business stay ahead of competitors.

 

Zara, Mercadona and QT Find Win-Win Formulas

“It’s a virtuous cycle,” Ton says: “Good execution and good workers yield more profits.” For example, Zara clothing and the Mercadona supermarket chain, both based in Spain, are growing despite a weak economy. Mercadona offers employees twice the minimum wage, bonuses, stable work, full-time schedules and opportunities for growth.

 

In the U.S., QT, or Quiktrip, is an example of a convenience store/gas station company providing “excellent customer service, fast, clean facilities and a high employee retention rate. People want to work there,” Ton says, and store profits are above industry averages. Trader Joe’s and Costco are other good examples.

 

How do they do it?  Ton offers a matrix four strategies that need to be used in combination to reap the greatest rewards:

1. Invest in people and combine that with operational excellence to drive sales.

2.   Standardize processes to increase efficiency and empower employees to make decisions for customers

3.  Cross-train employees to encourage agility, flexibility and knowledge.

4. Offer fewer products, but operate with slack; never under-staff.

Ton sums up as follows: “In my book, The Good Jobs Strategy, I show that it is possible to offer good jobs to workers, low prices and excellent service to customers, and great returns to shareholders-- all at the same time. What makes good jobs not only possible but very profitable—even in low-cost service businesses—is a set of counterintuitive choices that transforms the company’s investment in workers into high performance. What are these choices? Offer less, combine standardization with empowerment, cross-train, and operate with slack. It’s a combination that lowers operating costs, increases worker productivity and puts workers at the center of a company's success.”https://mitsloan.mit.edu/newsroom/images/2013-goodjobs.gif

 

 

Biography:

Ton’s work has been published in a variety of journals, including Organization Science, Production and Operations Management, and the Harvard Business Review. In addition, she has written numerous cases that explore different approaches to managing retail stores and labor. Prior to MIT Sloan, Ton spent seven years as an assistant professor in the Technology and Operations Management area at Harvard Business School, where she was awarded the HBS Faculty Teaching Award for teaching excellence.

Ton holds a DBA from Harvard Business School and a BS in Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering from Pennsylvania State University.

There are many metrics and data available that quantify the use of digital goods and services. We know, for example, how many billions songs are downloaded and how much revenue that garners. We can tell how many articles there are on Wikipedia and how many hours people spend on Facebook.

 

To date, there are primarily three ways to quantify the impact digitization is having: We can look at the contribution of the transactions to the GDP; we can look at an IT company’s stock values, or we can track consumer spending and prices as indicators of consumer surplus created.

 

 

But none of these approaches measure the real value of digital services when the services are free, according to our latest research at MIT’s Center for Digital Business. For example, a money-only model may be missing 95% of the value consumers derive online. Finding that new metric is the focus of my team’s latest research. Free goods and services on the Internet have exploded in the past decade, and the average American now spends more than 32 hours a month online.

 

Once they have an Internet connection, they don't spend money to use Wikipedia, Facebook or Youtube, so the value of these services isn't properly reflected in the GDP statistics.

This gap is a problem we have been grappling with for some time, including in a Sloan Management Review article a few years ago.

 

At the recent annual meeting we offered a possible solution to the measurement problem: Consumers pay with time, not just money, and where they choose to spend their limited time and attention online is a form of voting. Increasingly, the digital economy is the 'attention economy.' Our research is calculating a demand curve for time and estimating how much consumers implicitly value free goods based on use of their time, not on dollars, spent on the Internet.

 

One preliminary finding shows that free goods added the equivalent of $139 billion in value to the economy in 2010-- more than 1% of the GDP and equal to $647 per person. The findings may have an impact of calculations such as the GDP and other economic metrics.


chart.JPG



Whether you think it’s a good idea or not, mobile and social technologies are creating new ways to follow, analyze and predict how people are “embedded in society,” and how and where they spend their time and money. The implications of these changes for individuals, as well as society, are being studied by Alex `Sandy’ Pentland, director of MIT’s Human Dynamics Laboratory and the MIT Media Lab Entrepreneurship Program.

 

His current research examines four ways that Big Data can help to understand human behavior: By modeling social influence; by examining social influence dynamics; by actually shaping behavior, and by creating more data-driven societies.  Pentland hopes these insights may help reverse “many of the frustrating phenomena that we are familiar with....fads, groupthink, and projects that just go nowhere.”

 

The MIT researchers looked at social influence networks and their relationship to learning, purchases and other behaviors by following 65 young families for one year. One finding was that social influence incentives work to change behavior more than other incentives because in a group, members have common ties and an exchange network on which to rely. Local information can pressure peers to act in certain ways and to be rewarded for those behaviors. “Incenting the social ties can be efficient,” Pentland explained at a recent MIT CDB seminar.

untitled.bmp

 

In call centers, for example, productivity improves with more coffee breaks, because workers share information that leads to better performance. Similarly, “social traders who aren’t isolated and aren’t in echo chambers,” perform best, he said. The point is to “encourage diversity of ideas and engagement.”

 

The Human Dynamics Lab at the MIT Media Laboratories pioneered the idea of a society enabled by Big Data. The Lab has developed technologies such as reality mining, which uses mobile phone data to extract patterns that predict future human behavior, as well as a `nervous system’ framework for dramatically more efficient transportation, health, energy, and financial systems.

 

Pentland’s latest research could be applied to what he calls, “data-driven societies.” Since geography influences behavior and patterns of communications, which creates “collective intelligence” in local groups,” city-scientist, for instance, may be able to predict the GDP of a city by looking at social-tie patterns. In turn, this might help city planners build environments that better match the habits of the local citizens.

 

Separately, McKinsey is conducting research into social intelligence. In its new report, McKinsey discusses social intelligence as a means of guiding better business decisions.

 

The report states that by tapping into social platforms, businesses can gather and harness employee knowledge.

Today, many people who have expert knowledge and shape perceptions about markets are freely exchanging data and viewpoints through social platforms. By identifying and engaging these players, employing potent Web-focused analytics to draw strategic meaning from social-media data, and channeling this information to people within the organization who need and want it, companies can develop a “social intelligence” that is forward looking, global in scope, and capable of playing out in real time.

This isn’t to suggest that “social” will entirely displace current methods of intelligence gathering. But it should emerge as a strong complement. As it does, social-intelligence literacy will become a critical asset for C-level executives and board members seeking the best possible basis for their decisions.

And in another report Capturing Business Value with Social Technologies, McKinsey conducted an in-depth analysis of four industry sectors that represent almost 20 percent of global sales.

[The analysis] suggests that social platforms can unlock $900 billion to $1.3 trillion in value in those sectors alone. Two-thirds of this value creation opportunity lies in improving communication and collaboration within and across enterprises. Frequently, these improvements will go well beyond the areas many companies have focused on to date in their social-media efforts: connecting with consumers, deriving customer insights for marketing and product development, and providing customer service.

 

Clearly, Pentland’s work supports McKinsey’s conclusion that: “Social technologies are destined to play a much larger role, not only in individual interactions, but also in how companies (and Pentland might add, societies), are organized and managed.”

 

Sandy Pentland is a member of this community. Comment on his work here.