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Big Data's Big Implications

Posted by Erik Brynjolfsson in Latest Research on Feb 14, 2012 10:25:13 PM

That the amount of business data is skyrocketing is hardly news. All we have to do is consider the huge volumes of data and archives at any major financial institution, retail business or healthcare organization. Then multiply those amounts by a several times and you’ll have an idea of the staggering amount of information amassed at web-based businesses such as Google and Amazon.

 

More important than the quantity of information generated, however, is an understanding of how it is used and how it can create value for organizations, their customers and the overall economy. At the MIT Center for Digital Business, a recent statistical study on the implications of big data offers significant proof that proper use of analytics and business intelligence tools can help businesses use their digital information to grow efficiently and show bottom-line results.

 

Specifically, my paper with Heekyung Kim, Strength in Numbers: How Does Data-Driven Decisionmaking Affect Firm Performance?, finds that “companies that use data-driven analytics instead of intuition have 5%-6% higher productivity and profits than competitors.” Research was based on the business practices and information technology investments of 179 large publicly traded firms. Huge improvements in metrics are allowing a granular analysis of data—whether it resides on mobile devices, in email or elsewhere in data centers-- to find out more about customer behavior. What’s more, the relationship between data-driven decisionmaking and performance also appears in other measures such as asset utilization, return on equity and market value. Our results provide some of the first large-scale data on the direct connection between data-driven decision making and firm performance.

 

As we wrote in the recent Atlantic magazine article:

“Today, businesses can measure their activities and customer relationships with unprecedented precision. As a result, they are awash with data. This is particularly evident in the digital economy, where clickstream data give precisely targeted and real-time insights into consumer behavior.”

 

And while web-based digital companies – notably, Amazon and Google--are in the forefront of data analysis, now we are seeing offline companies in logistics, manufacturing, retail, casinos and finance making use of these techniques as well. Gallo Wines, UPS, Caesar’s Entertainment and Match.com are a few examples cited in the Atlantic article. Marketing and sales organization are leading the way and are far ahead of some other departmental users, but increasingly, we see business units such as HR using email to help internal staff productivity benefits. Similarly, manufacturing lines are gaining access to real-time data from CRM and ERP systems to help them track trends and demand.

 

To delve into this topic in-depth, we are offering a new two-day executive education course on March 28 at MIT Sloan in Cambridge, Mass. [see related blog for details here.]

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